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A Tale of Two Cities is a great work of Victorian literature; I have reduced it to a silly Mad-Lib.  Enjoy!

It was the (adj, superlative) of times, it was the worst of (plural noun).  Mr. Lorry brings the (adj) Lucie Manette to her long-lost (noun), Doctor Manette, who has spent (number) years in the Bastille.  He has passed the time (verb-ing) (plural noun), a skill he learned in prison.  Meeting his daughter, Doctor Manette has been “(verb – past tense) to life.”  The story then jumps ahead (number) years to London and the trial of Charles Darnay, convicted of (crime) against (plural noun).  He is (adverb) acquitted, thanks to his (adj) lawyers, Mr. Stryver and Mr. Carton.  Darnay, Stryver, and Carton all become (plural noun) of the Manette’s, and they all (adverb) (verb, present tense) the young Lucie.

Meanwhile, in France, the (adj) Marquis Evremonde (verb ending in -s) a small child in the street and later that night is (adverb) (verb-past tense)!  The reader also discovers that Charles Darnay is related to the Marquis, but (verb-present tense) him for being so cruel to the (plural noun) of France.  Let’s just say the people are pretty (adj) right now.  Then a giant casket of (beverage) spills in the streets, which is of course a metaphor for (idea – intangible), which we find out later.  Back in England, Darnay finally (verb-action) Lucie, and they are briefly (adj) until he (adv) goes back to France to help out a friend of his who is in prison.  In France, the Revolution is (verb-ing).  As soon as he arrives, Darnay is taken prisoner for his connections to the aristocracy and immediately sent to (place).  Doctor Manette comes to (verb) him but is only temporarily (adj).  Darnay is sentenced to (punishment)!  The night before his execution, Sydney Carton, who we have established is a total (noun), changes places with Darnay and Darnay is (adj)!  In the final scene, Sydney Carton (verb-present tense) but his life is (adj).

Here’s the version that Heather filled in the words for:

It was the (horniest) of times, it was the worst of (cars).  Mr. Lorry brings the (bright) Lucie Manette to her long-lost (clouds), Doctor Manette, who has spent (6) years in the Bastille.  He has passed the time (grating) (tomatoes), a skill he learned in prison.  Meeting his daughter, Doctor Manette has been “(treated) to life.”  The story then jumps ahead (11) years to London and the trial of Charles Darnay, convicted of (vandalism) against (cupcakes).  He is (playfully) acquitted, thanks to his (gray) lawyers, Mr. Stryver and Mr. Carton.  Darnay, Stryver, and Carton all become (drinks) of the Manette’s, and they all (lusciously) (throw) the young Lucie.

Meanwhile, in France, the (colossal) Marquis Evremonde (coils) a small child in the street and later that night is (boldly) (abided)!  The reader also discovers that Charles Darnay is related to the Marquis, but (evaluates) him for being so cruel to the (bees) of France.  Let’s just say the people are pretty (crooked) right now.  Then a giant casket of (Jagermeister) spills in the streets, which is of course a metaphor for (the soul), which we find out later.  Back in England, Darnay finally (strangles) Lucie, and they are briefly (ancient) until he (lovingly) goes back to France to help out a friend of his who is in prison.  In France, the Revolution is (dancing).  As soon as he arrives, Darnay is taken prisoner for his connections to the aristocracy and immediately sent to (Islington).  Doctor Manette comes to (haunt) him but is only temporarily (sticky).  Darnay is sentenced to (flogging)!  The night before his execution, Sydney Carton, who we have established is a total (key), changes places with Darnay and Darnay is (filthy)!  In the final scene, Sydney Carton (possesses) but his life is (hot).

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