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<150 year old spoilers alert!  Ugh, do I have to say this?>

Here’s my mad-lib version of Madame Bovary.  Enjoy!

Welcome to <country>!  First, we <verb> Charles, who is mediocre at just about everything, including his career in <profession>.  He is a nice enough <noun>, though, and falls in love with Emma, the daughter of one of his patients.  Emma <verb-ends in ‘s’> him too, and the two <plural noun> marry.  Emma soon becomes disullusioned by her <noun>, particularly after going to <event> and getting <adjective>.  In fact, she is so <adjective> that she makes herself ill, but then discovers she is <state of being>.  Charles is totally <adjective> and moves his wife to another town.  This doesn’t help.  In the new town, Emma meets Leon, a/an <adjective> <profession>. The two <verb> right away, but they feel <adjective> about it.  Then, Emma <verb- ends in ‘s’> and she is still <adjective>.  She’s kind of a/an <insulting name>.  Leon finally wises up and leaves, so Emma finds another <noun> to <verb>.  The next lucky guy is the <adjective> Rodolphe, who <adverb> woos Emma until she agrees to have an affair with him.  Meanwhile, the hapless Charles attempts to <verb> a local man with <chronic disease>, but he botches the surgery entirely and leaves him even worse off than he started.  Emma is understandably <adjective> and continues her affair with Rodolphe.  Eventually, Rodolphe becomes <adjective> and ditches Emma.  Emma handles the situation <adverb> and almost dies of grief.  Charles is still confused and clueless.  Emma <verb-ending in ‘s’> Leon again at the opera, and they finally get it on metaphorically in a <form of conveyance>.  While <verb-ing> Leon, Emma also <adverb> continues to accrue debts without telling Charles.  Emma grows bored of Leon, but her debts are so great that she asks him and anyone she can find for money, including Rodolphe.  No one will <verb> her anymore, so she kills herself by ingesting <gross food>.  <Adjective> Charles mourns his wife earnestly until eventually finding the <plural noun> his wife shared with Leon and Rodolphe.  He <verb-ending in ‘s’> <adverb>.  What a/an <adjective> story!

And here is the mad-lib filled in by the obliging Heather.

Welcome to <Moldova>!  First, we <cry> Charles, who is mediocre at just about everything, including his career in <Crab fishing>.  He is a nice enough <clock>, though, and falls in love with Emma, the daughter of one of his patients.  Emma <skids> him too, and the two <kites> marry.  Emma soon becomes disullusioned by her <pencil>, particularly after going to <the World’s Fair> and getting <gloomy>.  In fact, she is so <blue> that she makes herself ill, but then discovers she is <happened>.  Charles is totally <brainy> and moves his wife to another town.  This doesn’t help.  In the new town, Emma meets Leon, a/an <long> <stenographer>. The two <invade> right away, but they feel <striking> about it.  Then, Emma <collides> and she is still <balmy>.  She’s kind of a/an <prat>.  Leon finally wises up and leaves, so Emma finds another <dragon> to <write>.  The next lucky guy is the <fleeting> Rodolphe, who <sublimely> woos Emma until she agrees to have an affair with him.  Meanwhile, the hapless Charles attempts to <seize> a local man with <diptheria>, but he botches the surgery entirely and leaves him even worse off than he started.  Emma is understandably <barren> and continues her affair with Rodolphe.  Eventually, Rodolphe becomes <glowing> and ditches Emma.  Emma handles the situation <kindly> and almost dies of grief.  Charles is still confused and clueless.  Emma <chastises> Leon again at the opera, and they finally get it on metaphorically in a <camel>.  While <flogging> Leon, Emma also <lightly> continues to accrue debts without telling Charles.  Emma grows bored of Leon, but her debts are so great that she asks him and anyone she can find for money, including Rodolphe.  No one will <confuse> her anymore, so she kills herself by ingesting <Vegemite>.  <Aggressive> Charles mourns his wife earnestly until eventually finding the <bicycles> his wife shared with Leon and Rodolphe.  He <curses> <slyly>.  What a/an <stormy> story!

The moral of this story is never share bicycles with strange men and don’t eat Vegemite.

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